20 Small Bathroom Ideas

“Little bathrooms may appear like a troublesome task to tackle, be that as it may, these spaces may acquaint a sharp plan challenge to add to your plate.  Each configuration component in a little restroom ought to have a reason and be functional somehow or another to make a space-sparing area. Making a practical and stockpiling well disposed lavatory may be exactly what your home needs.”

Photo by http://homerenovations.about.com/

Photo by http://homerenovations.about.com/

Here, Dutch Boy’s High Spirits nicely complements the natural wood touches.

  • Dutch Boy: High Spirits and White C3-4
  • Bracket lights on either side of mirror.
  • Subway tile on lower portion of wall.
Photo by http://homerenovations.about.com/

Photo by http://homerenovations.about.com/

If you’re looking for some great small bathroom ideas, you need to think outside the box–figuratively and literally.

Small Bath, Defined

A small bathroom in the eyes of Donald Trump will probably be different in the eyes of you or me.

So, for one thing, small bathrooms are small in relation to the overall size of the house. Generally, we can say that a small bathroom ranges from 16 square feet to 50 or 60 square feet.

Secondly, small bathrooms do not all have the same functions. A small bathroom can be:

  • Half-Bath: A toilet and sink, just a place for guests to take care of their basic needs and wash their hands.
  • Three-Quarter Bath: Toilet, sink, and either shower or tub. A fully-functioning bathroom to take care of all of the residents’ needs.
  • Full Bath: Toilet, sink, shower, and tub. It’s difficult to shoehorn a separate shower and tub into a small bathroom, so these tend to be combined as one unit.

In this photo, peaceful colors give bathroom feeling of spaciousness. Wainscot-fronted shelf behind sink provides storage space.

  • Paint: Wainscot is Valspar Sparkling Sage (5005-3B ); Wall Main Color is Woodlawn Promised Land (5007-6C);
  • Bathroom console sink 35 1/2″ x 23 1/4″ x 36 1/4″ high. Shop Direct – St. Thomas Console Sink
  • Wainscot board

 

Read more: http://homerenovations.about.com/od/bathroomdesign/ss/SmallBathroomIdeas.htm?utm_source=zergnet&utm_medium=tcg&utm_campaign=zergnet-test-537331#step2

Water Saving Tips: In the Bathroom

“Saving water can extend the life of your septic system by decreasing soil immersion, and diminishing any contamination because of holes, on the other hand, overloading sewer system can likewise bring about untreated sewage to stream to lakes and waterways. But in a typical home, half of all the water  utilized in the restroom. This makes it an extraordinary spot to begin sparing water.”

Photo by http://www.gracelinks.org/

Photo by http://www.gracelinks.org/

You know you can save water by turning off the tap while you brush your teeth, “letting it mellow” and taking care not to waste it while cooking and cleaning. But did you know this direct water use only makes up a small portion of all the water you use? There is way more water – also known as virtual water – in the food, goods and services you consume.

Read on to learn how to save water in the bathroom (be sure to check out our tips for the laundry and energy use), and take our Water Footprint Calculator to find out how much water you use directly and indirectly each day.

In the Shower

  • Put a bucket in the shower while you’re waiting for the water to warm up, and use the water you catch for watering plants, flushing the toilet or cleaning.
  • Install a low-flow showerhead. It may cost you some money up front, but your water conservation efforts will save you money down the road. Conventional showerheads flow at 5 gallons per minute or more, whereas low-flow showerheads typically flow at 2.5 gallons per minute (or less!).
  • Spend less time in the shower. If you lose track of time, bring a radio into the bathroom and time yourself by how many songs play while you’re in there. Try to get your shower time down to a single song (epic rock ballads like Freebird don’t count!).
  • Turn off the water if you shave or brush your teeth in the shower to save time.

In the Bathtub

  • Think of baths as an occasional treat and stick to showers. The average bath uses 35 to 50 gallons of water, whereas a 10-minute shower with a low-flow showerhead only uses 25 gallons.

At the Sink

  • Turn off the water while you brush your teeth and shave.
  • Install low-flow faucet aerators in your sinks – you can save gallons of water each time you use the tap. Conventional faucets flow as high as 3 gallons per minute, but low-flow faucets flow at 1.5 gallons per minute.
  • Fix those leaky faucets. That constant drip is more than just annoying; it’s also a huge waste of water. You can lose more than 20 gallons of water a day from a single drippy faucet!

Read more: http://www.gracelinks.org/437/water-saving-tips-in-the-bathroom