Maternity and nursing bras 101

It is important that pregnant and nursing women have supportive, comfortable bras. During this time, a woman’s breasts are constantly changing. It may seem like finding the perfect maternity or nursing bra is a daunting task but don’t get discouraged!

 

Do I need a new bra during pregnancy?

Yes, most likely. Like the rest of your body, your breasts are changing too, becoming bigger and more sensitive to the touch. Chalk up this metamorphosis to hormonal shifts, weight gain, an expanding rib cage, and, later in pregnancy, mammary glands that are preparing to make milk for your baby.

While it may be tempting to make do with the bras you have (think of the savings!), it’s best to invest in a few good bras. Your growing breasts are heavier – the developing glandular tissues can add on a few ounces per breast, at least – and deserve some comfy support.

How do I know when it’s time for a new bra?

A good rule of thumb: Tight ain’t right. When you take off the bra and see indentations where the band and straps were, your breasts are spilling out of your bra cups, or your bra feels too snug, it’s time to purchase a new one, says Felina Gallagher of the Upper Breast Side, a breastfeeding resource center in Manhattan.

Every woman is different, every pregnancy is different, and your breasts will change in a way that’s unique to you. You may find that your cup size continues to increase throughout your pregnancy, or your breasts might grow during your first trimester and then not increase in size again until the last few months. Depending on how you grow, you may need to go bra shopping several times during your pregnancy.

What’s the difference between regular, maternity, and nursing bras?

A maternity bra is a souped-up version of a regular bra – specifically designed to comfortably support your growing breasts during pregnancy. Wider straps, a soft cotton lining, and extra hooks and eyes on the band are just a few of the features you’ll typically find in a maternity bra. Maternity bras usually don’t have underwire cups. Note: Some regular bras offer these features as well and will work fine during pregnancy.

Maternity and nursing bras differ in one basic way: Nursing bras have clasps or panels that allow easy access to the nipples for breastfeeding.

Many women prefer a combination of both, buying maternity bras or larger sizes of their favorite pre-pregnancy bra …

 

 

Read more: http://www.babycenter.com/0_maternity-and-nursing-bras-101_10347729.bc

15 Insights on Improving Mother-Daughter Relationships

Parents are quite often neglected by their own sons and daughters. Under the effects of the youthful blood, these youngsters go after money and the career, leaving their older parents in the cold confines of their homes. This is the time to make the amends.

 

15 Insights on Improving Mother-Daughter Relationships

Mother-daughter relationships are complex and diverse. Some mothers and daughters are best friends. Others talk once a week. Some see each other weekly; others live in different states or countries. Some spar regularly. Some avoid conflict. Others talk through everything. And undoubtedly, there’s a hint of all these things in most relationships.

There also are ups and downs, no matter how positive (or prickly) the relationship. In her private practice, Roni Cohen-Sandler, Ph.D, psychologist and co-author of I’m Not Mad, I Just Hate You! A New Understanding of Mother-Daughter Conflict, sees three primary complaints that daughters have about their moms: Moms try to parent them and are overly critical and demanding. From moms’ perspective, daughters don’t listen to them, make poor choices and have no time for them.

Whatever your relationship with your mother or daughter, you can always make improvements. Here’s how to enhance your communication and connection and cut down on clashes.

1. Make the first move.

Don’t wait for the other person to make the first move, said Linda Mintle, Ph.D, marriage and family therapist and author of I Love My Mother, But… Practical Help to Get the Most Out of Your Relationship. Doing so inevitably leaves relationships stuck. “Think about how you feel in the relationship and what you can do to change.”

2. Change yourself.

Many think that the only way to improve a relationship is for the other person to change their ways. But you aren’t chained to their actions; you can change your own reactions and responses, Mintle said. Interestingly, this can still alter your relationship. Think of it as a dance, she said. When one person changes their steps, the dance inevitably changes.

3. Have realistic expectations.

Both moms and daughters often have idealistic expectations about their relationship. For instance, kids commonly think their mom will be nurturing and present — always. This idea can develop from an early age. When her kids were young, Mintle found herself setting up this unrealistic belief during their nightly reading time. She’d read a book about a mama bunny who rescued her son every time he ventured out and tried a risky activity, such as sailing or mountain-climbing.

4. Communicate.

Lack of communication is a common challenge with moms and daughters. “In some ways they can be so close or feel so close that they believe that each of them should know how the other one feels,” Cohen-Sandler said. “What happens as a result is they don’t communicate.” Or they …

Read more: http://psychcentral.com/lib/15-insights-on-improving-mother-daughter-relationships/